School Accountability Report Card    
  Reported for School Year 2003-2004  

Published During 2004-2005

 

Notes regarding the source and currency of data:
Data included in this School Accountability Report Card (SARC) are consistent with State Board of Education guidelines, which are available at the California Department of Education Web site http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/definitions04.asp. Most data presented in this report were collected from the 2003-04 school year or from the two preceding years (2001-02 and 2002-03). Due to the certification timelines for graduation, dropout, and fiscal information, the data for these sections of the report were collected in 2002-03.

 

School Information

District Information

 School Name

 Mayfair High

 District Name

 Bellflower Unified

 Principal

 Mr. Joseph Perry

 Superintendent

 Rick Kemppainen

 Street

 6000 N. Woodruff Ave.

 Street

 16703 S. Clark Ave.

 City, State, Zip

 Lakewood, CA    90713-1124

 City, State, Zip

 Bellflower, CA    90706-5203

 Phone Number

 (562) 925-9981

 Phone Number

 (562) 866-9011

 FAX Number

 (562) 804-1656

 FAX Number

 (562) 866-7713

 Web Site

 http://www.busd.k12.ca.us/schools/mayfair.html

 Web Site

 http://www.busd.k12.ca.us

 CDS Code

 19-64303-1935618

 SARC Contact

 Steven Yuchno


School Description and Mission Statement

 We, the staff at Mayfair High/Middle School, are proud to present our Accountability Report Card to our school community. This comprehensive report provides important information and data regarding assessment of Mayfair’s performance and conditions reflective of the 2003-2004 school year.
The Mayfair campus includes a middle school and a high school and services students in grades seven through twelve. The school’s mission and vision provides all students with a rigorous, challenging curriculum of what students must know and be able to do upon graduation from high school. Our comprehensive, standards-driven instructional program ensures that all students are connected to the school in meaningful ways through academic programs, extra curricular activities, sports, and career-based learning. Our students can select from a broad range of courses and curricular paths that enable them to achieve the expected school-wide learning results and pursue their post-secondary endeavors for higher education or success in the workplace.
Mayfair was recognized as a California Distinguished School for its exemplary educational programs. The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and the California Department of Education (CDE) recently granted Mayfair a full term accreditation of six years. This accreditation is a confirmation to other educational institutions of higher learning and to the general public that Mayfair meets the rigorous Focus on Learning qualitative criteria and the WASC/CDE standards of vision and leadership, curriculum, instruction and assessment, student support and resources, and school culture, as well as achieving its own stated objectives.
Mayfair believes that parents are an integral part of the educational process. This partnership provides an environment of excellence where everyone works in the best interests of students. The collaborative support of the Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA), Mayfair’s business partners, booster clubs and the community provide extraordinary efforts toward enriching programs for our students.

Our school colors of navy blue and white, the Monsoon mascot, and support of school-sponsored activities, such as athletics, student leadership, and club and service organizations connect students beyond the classroom and enhance their educational experiences. Every day our school spirit is a reflection of students’ pride in their school, community and themselves 


Opportunities for Parental Involvement

 Contact Person Name

 Joe Perry

 Contact Person Phone Number

 (562) 925-9981

Family support is an integral part of the educational process. Without this vital link, the goals set in the mission and vision statements of the school would be unachievable. Making parents feel welcome in the school and important to the success of the students has been the center of the school’s strategies that send the message that family involvement is essential to advance our students’ education. A coordinated effort between the community and the school provides a safe and nurturing environment for all students.

Parents are leaders in decision-making circumstances in the PTSA, on the School Site Council, on the English Learner Advisory Committee, in our school Booster Clubs and as parent volunteers. In order to build public confidence, newsletters, special bulletins, flyers, and other forms of written communication elicit active participation and support for school programs.


I. Demographic Information

Student Enrollment, by Grade Level
Data reported are the number of students in each grade level as reported by the California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS).

 Grade Level

 Enrollment

 Grade 7

666 

 Grade 8

681 

 Grade 9

663 

 Grade 10

566 

 Grade 11

486 

 Grade 12

440 

 Ungraded Secondary

 Total Enrollment

3502 


Student Enrollment, by Ethnic Group
Data reported are the number and percent of students in each racial/ethnic category as reported by CBEDS.

 Racial/Ethnic Category

 Number
of
Students

 Percent
of
Students

 Racial/Ethnic Category

 Number
of
Students

 Percent
of
Students

 African-American

621 

17.7 

 Hispanic or Latino

1,093 

31.2 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

12 

0.3 

 Pacific Islander

48 

1.4 

 Asian

174 

5.0 

 White (Not Hispanic)

1,299 

37.1 

 Filipino

169 

4.8 

 Multiple or No Response

86 

2.5 


II. School Safety and Climate for Learning

School Safety Plan

 Date of Last Review/Update

 March 1, 2004

 Date Last Discussed with Staff

 March 1, 2004

The staff, students, parents, the Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA), the School Site Council and community members at the school strive to provide effective ways to give all students the safe, clean, healthy, and disciplined conditions that allow teachers to effectively teach and students to actively learn. The school places the physical, emotional, and psychological safety and well being of its students and staff among our highest priorities. All elements of the school, the education provided, the student support staff, the school’s leadership, our parents and families, and the school’s surrounding community, combine to produce a positive, safe, and secure environment for all students. The school’s comprehensive safety plan establishes regular review of emergency response plans, expectations for the cleanliness and timely maintenance of facilities, and behavioral norms. The school meets its obligation to provide support systems that promote the health and safety of students and adults alike.


School Programs and Practices that Promote a Positive Learning Environment

Students who feel good about themselves and who have opportunities to receive recognition tend to perform better academically and socially, so the school makes every effort to acknowledge good behavior and performance.

Our school-wide discipline plan is consistently administered, and students and staff members follow it. This plan includes standards for expected behavior and consequences for failure to comply with the standards, which have been agreed upon by a committee of teachers, parents, and students. There is an emphasis on rewarding students who meet the agreed upon expectations. Some of our recognition programs include Student of the Month, Daily Patriotic Observance, Associated Student Body (ASB) recognitions, Bank of America Awards Program, Governor’s Scholars Award Program, Departmental Academic Awards, and PTSA recognitions of individual and class accomplishments. Opportunities are also provided for students to be involved in multi-cultural assemblies, clubs, and after school activities.


Suspensions and Expulsions
Data reported are the number of suspensions and expulsions (i.e., the total number of incidents that result in a suspension or expulsion). The rate of suspensions and expulsions is the total number of incidents divided by the school's total enrollment as reported by CBEDS for the given year. In unified school districts, a comparison between a particular type of school (elementary, middle, high) and the district average may be misleading. Schools have the option of comparing their data with the district-wide average for the same type of school.

 

 School

 District

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 Number of Suspensions

1,036 

1076 

903 

3,885 

3,383 

2,736 

 Rate of Suspensions

.33 

.32 

.26 

.25 

.21 

.18 

 Number of Expulsions

30 

35 

28 

63 

57 

56 

 Rate of Expulsions

>.01 

.01 

>.01 

>.01 

>.01 

>.01 


School Facilities
Safety, cleanliness, and adequacy of school facilities, including any needed maintenance to ensure good repair. Description of the condition and cleanliness of the school grounds, buildings, and restrooms.

The appearance of a school’s grounds, buildings, and classrooms influences the attitude of all who visit and use the campus. The district takes great efforts to ensure that all schools are clean, safe, and functional. The school’s facilities support the special needs of all students. There are areas on campus, including the library-media center, teachers’ lounges, and a teachers’ workroom, for students and staff to go for collaboration and research.

Students utilize a grassy, park-like atmosphere. An attractive wrought iron fence encloses the front of the school and all gates are locked and unlocked to accommodate the daily schedule. Signs are posted at the front gate informing the public that the school is tobacco free, and the school follows a “No Trash” policy that encourages students and staff to assume personal responsibility for the appearance of the campus. The district governing board has adopted cleaning standards for all schools in the district. A summary of these standards is available at the school office. The principal works daily with the custodial staff to develop cleaning schedules to ensure a clean and safe school.

District maintenance staff ensures that the repairs necessary to keep the school in good repair and working order are completed in a timely manner. A work order process is used to ensure efficient service and that emergency repairs are given the highest priority. An independent evaluation of the school’s facilities needs was completed in July, 2003. None of the emergency needs identified in the California Education Code were identified at the school.


III. Academic Data

Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR)
Through the California Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) program, students in grades 2-11 are tested annually in various subject areas. Currently, the STAR program includes California Standards Tests (CST) and a norm-referenced test (NRT). The CST tests English-language arts and mathematics in grades 2-11, science in grades 5, 9, 10, and 11, and history-social science in grades 8, 10, and 11. The NRT tests reading, language, and mathematics in grades 2-11, spelling in grades 2-8, and science in grades 9-11.

California Standards Tests (CST)
The California Standards Tests (CST) show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. Student scores are reported as performance levels. The five performance levels are Advanced (exceeds state standards), Proficient (meets state standards), Basic (approaching state standards), Below Basic (below state standards), and Far Below Basic (well below state standards). Students scoring at the Proficient or Advanced level meet state standards in that content area. Students scoring at the Proficient or Advanced level meet state standards in that content area. Students with significant cognitive disabilities who are unable to take the CST are tested using the California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA). Detailed information regarding CST and CAPA results for each grade and proficiency level can be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov or by speaking with the school principal. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

CST - All Students
Data reported are the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards).

 Subject

 School

 District

 State

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 English-Language Arts

 31

 33

 33

 26

 30

 31

 32

 35

 36

 Mathematics

 22

 23

 22

 25

 30

 30

 31

 35

 34

 Science

 37

 36

 26

 20

 19

 19

 30

 27

 25

 History-Social Science

 28

 32

 33

 19

 22

 25

 28

 28

 29


CST - Racial/Ethnic Groups
Data reported are the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards).

 Subject

 African-
American

 Asian

 Filipino

 Hispanic
or Latino

 Pacific
Islander

 White
(not
Hispanic)

 English-Language Arts

 23

 51

 48

 22

 24

 42

 Mathematics

 11

 50

 28

 17

 22

 28

 Science

 15

 40

 41

 15

 11

 35

 History-Social Science

 24

 50

 46

 24

 23

 40


CST - Subgroups
Data reported are the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards).

Subject

 Male 

Female

English
Learners

Economically
Disadvantaged

Students With
Disabilities

Yes

No

Yes

No

 English-Language Arts

 30

 36

 2

 19

 39

 8

 35

 Mathematics

 24

 21

 9

 15

 26

 9

 24

 Science

 31

 20

 4

 14

 30

 10

 27

 History-Social Science

 36

 30

 5

 22

 38

 10

 35


Norm-Referenced Test (NRT)
Reading and mathematics results from the California Schievement Test, Sixth Edition (CAT-6), the current NRT adopted by the State Board of Education, are reported for each grade level as the percent of tested students scoring at or above the 50th percentile (the national average). School results are compared to results at the district and state levels. The CAT-6 was adopted in 2003; therefore, no data are reported for 2002. Detailed information regarding results for each grade level can be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov/ or by speaking with the school principal. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

NRT - All Students
Data reported are the percent of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile.

Subject

 School

 District

 State

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 Reading

 ---

 46

 55

 ---

 37

 42

 ---

 43

 43

 Mathematics

 ---

 50

 51

 ---

 46

 48

 ---

 50

 51


NRT - Racial/Ethnic Groups
Data reported are the percent of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile.

Subject

 African-
American

 Asian

 Filipino

 Hispanic
or Latino

 Pacific
Islander

 White
(not
Hispanic)

 Reading

 45

 72

 61

 44

 40

 66

 Mathematics

 36

 75

 62

 43

 33

 61


NRT - Subgroups
Data reported are the percent of students scoring at or above the 50th percentile.

Subject

   Male  

 Female

 English
Learners

Economically
Disadvantaged

 Students With
Disabilities

 Yes

 No

 Yes

 No

 Reading

 52

 58

 10

 42

 61

 17

 58

 Mathematics

 53

 49

 19

 39

 57

 19

 54


California Physical Fitness Test
Data reported are the percent of students meeting fitness standards (scoring in the healthy fitness zone on all six fitness standards). Detailed information regarding the California Physical Fitness Test may be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/pf/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 Grade
Level

 School

 District

 State

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

  Total 

 Female

  Male 

 9

 27.3

 19.9

 34.6

 21.6

 15.0

 27.8

 26.3

 25.3

 27.2


Academic Performance Index (API)

The Academic Performance Index (API) is a score on a scale of 200 to 1000 that annually measures the academic performance and progress of individual schools in California. On an interim basis, the state has set 800 as the API score that schools should strive to meet.

Growth Targets: The annual growth target for a school is 5 percent of the distance between its Base API and 800. The growth target for a school at or above 800 is to remain at or above 800. Actual growth is the number of API points a school gained between its base and growth years. Schools that reach their annual targets are eligible for awards. Schools that do not meet their targets and have a statewide API rank of one to five are eligible to participate in the Immediate Intervention/Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP), which provides resources to schools to improve their academic achievement. There was no money allocated to the II/USP Program in 2002 or 2003.

Subgroup APIs and Targets: In addition to a schoolwide API, schools also receive API scores for each numerically significant subgroup in the school (i.e., racial/ethnic subgroups and socioeconomically disadvantaged students). Growth targets, equal to 80 percent of the school's target, are also set for each of the subgroups. Each subgroup must also meet its target for the school to be eligible for awards.

Percent Tested: In order to be eligible for awards, elementary and middle schools must test at least 95 percent of their students in grades 2-8 and high schools must test at least 90 percent of their students in grades 9-11 on STAR.

Statewide Rank: Schools receiving a Base API score are ranked in ten categories of equal size (deciles) from one (lowest) to ten (highest), according to type of school (elementary, middle, or high school).

Similar Schools Rank: Schools also receive a ranking that compares that school to 100 other schools with similar demographic characteristics. Each set of 100 schools is ranked by API score from one (lowest) to ten (highest) to indicate how well the school performed compared to schools most like it.

API criteria are subject to change as new legislation is enacted into law. Detailed information about the API and the Public Schools Accountability Act (PSAA) can be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/ or by speaking with the school principal.

Schoolwide API

 API Base Data

 API Growth Data

 

 2001

 2002

 2003

 

From
2001
to 2002

From
2002
to 2003

From
2003
to 2004

 Percent Tested

 98

 97

 98

 Percent Tested

 97

 98

 99

 API Base Score

 644

 648

 662

 API Growth Score

 659

 660

 674

 Growth Target

 8

 8

 7

 Actual Growth

 15

 12

 12

 Statewide Rank

 6

 6

 6

 

 Similar Schools Rank

 6

 5

 6


API Subgroups - Racial/Ethnic Groups

 API Base Data

 API Growth Data

 

 2001

 2002

 2003

 

From
2001
to 2002

From
2002
to 2003

From
2003
to 2004

 African-American

 African-American

 API Base Score

 547

 577

 582

 API Growth Score

 571

 581

 612

 Growth Target

 6

 6

 6

 Actual Growth

 24

 4

 30

 Asian

 Asian

 API Base Score

 790

 770

 805

 API Growth Score

 797

 791

 799

 Growth Target

 6

 6

 A

 Actual Growth

 7

 21

 -6

 Filipino

 Filipino

 API Base Score

 

 745

 753

 API Growth Score

 

 744

 764

 Growth Target

 

 6

 6

 Actual Growth

 

 -1

 11

 Hispanic or Latino

 Hispanic or Latino

 API Base Score

 581

 590

 610

 API Growth Score

 599

 607

 625

 Growth Target

 6

 6

 6

 Actual Growth

 18

 17

 15

 White (Not Hispanic)

 White (Not Hispanic)

 API Base Score

 690

 691

 706

 API Growth Score

 710

 704

 714

 Growth Target

 6

 6

 6

 Actual Growth

 20

 13

 8


API Subgroups - Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

 API Base Data

 API Growth Data

 

 2001

 2002

 2003

 

From
2001
to 2002

From
2002
to 2003

From
2003
to 2004

 API Base Score

 570

 576

 589

 API Growth Score

 588

 587

 609

 Growth Target

 6

 6

 6

 Actual Growth

 18

 11

 20


State Award and Intervention Programs

Although state intervention and awards programs are currently in the California Education Code, the programs were not funded for the period addressed by this report. Therefore, there are currently no data available to report.


Federal Intervention Programs
Schools receiving Title I funding enter federal Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for two consecutive years. After entering PI, schools advance to the next level of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP. Information about PI, including a list of all PI schools, can be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/ or by speaking with the school principal.

 

 School

 District

 Year Identified for
 Program Improvement

 n/a

 ---

 Year in Program
 Improvement

 n/a

 ---

 Year Exited Program
 Improvement

 n/a

 ---

 Number of Schools Currently
 in Program Improvement

 ---

 0

 Percent of Schools Identified
 for Program Improvement

 ---

 0.0


Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all students perform at or above the proficient level on the state's standards-based assessments by 2014. In order to achieve this goal and meet annual performance objectives, districts and schools must improve each year according to set requirements. A "Yes" in the following table displaying Overall AYP Status indicated that AYP was met for all students and all subgroups, or that exception criteria were met, or that an appeal of the school or district's AYP status was approved. Additional data by subgroup show whether all groups of students in the school and district made the annual measurable objectives for the percent proficient or above and the participation rate required under AYP. Detailed information about AYP can be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/ or by speaking with the school principal.

 Overall

 School

 District

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 All Students

 ---

 No

 No

 ---

 No

 No

 

 Subgroups

 School

 District

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 All Students

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 African American

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 ---

 n/a

 n/a

 ---

 n/a

 n/a

 Asian

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 Filipino

 ---

 n/a

 n/a

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 Hispanic or Latino

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 Pacific Islander

 ---

 n/a

 n/a

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 White (not Hispanic)

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 English Learners

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 ---

 Yes

 Yes

 Students with Disabilities

 ---

 No

 No

 ---

 No

 No


IV. School Completion (Secondary Schools)

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)
Beginning with the graduating class of 2006, students in California public schools will have to pass the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. The School Accountability Report Card for that year will report the percent of students completing grade 12 who successfully completed the CAHSEE.

These data are not required to be reported until 2006 when they can be reported for the entire potential graduating class. When implemented, the data will be disaggregated by special education status, English language learners, socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnic group.


Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate
Data reported regarding progress toward reducing dropout rates over the most recent three-year period include: grade 9-12 enrollment, the number of dropouts, and the one-year dropout rate as reported by CBEDS. The formula for the one-year dropout rate is (grades 9-12 dropouts divided by grades 9-12 enrollment) multiplied by 100. The graduation rate, required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), is calculated by dividing the number of high school graduates by the sum of dropouts for grades 9 through 12, in consecutive years, plus the number of graduates.

 

 School

 District

 State

   2001  

   2002  

   2003  

   2001  

   2002  

   2003  

   2001  

   2002  

   2003  

 Enrollment (9-12)

 1845

 1941

 2046

 4153

 4358

 4452

 1735576

 1772417

 1830664

 Number of Dropouts

 5

 11

 11

 28

 31

 57

 47899

 48210

 58493

 Dropout Rate (1-year)

 0.3

 0.6

 0.5

 0.7

 0.7

 1.3

 2.8

 2.7

 3.2

 Graduation Rate

 98.4

 97.1

 96.6

 95.8

 95.2

 95.0

 86.7

 87.0

 86.7


V. Class Size

Average Teaching Load and Teaching Load Distribution
Data reported are the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (i.e., number of students), by subject area, as reported by CBEDS.

 Subject

 2002

 2003

 2004

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 English

 29.9

 30

 17

 51

 29.1

 31

 24

 51

 29.1

 37

 19

 58

 Mathematics

 32.8

 6

 29

 51

 33.3

 3

 26

 60

 32.4

 3

 23

 70

 Science

 32.7

 4

 28

 52

 33.2

 3

 30

 53

 32.7

 1

 37

 53

 Social Science

 33.9

 3

 19

 66

 34.6

 0

 23

 69

 34.1

 2

 22

 71


VI. Teacher and Staff Information

Core Academic Courses Not Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers
The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all teachers teaching in core academic subjects are to be "highly qualified" not later than the end of the 2005-06 school year. In general, NCLB requires that each teacher must have: (1) a bachelor's degree, (2) a state credential or an Intern Certificate/Credential for no more than three years, and (3) demonstrated subject matter competence for each core subject to be taught by the teacher. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found at the California Department of Education's Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/.

For a school, the data reported are the percent of a school's classes in core content areas not taught by NCLB compliant teachers. For a district, the data reported are the percent of all classes in core content areas not taught by NCLB compliant teachers in all schools in the district, in high-poverty schools in the district, and in low-poverty schools in the district.

 

   School  

   District  

 This School

 21.7

 ---

 All Schools in District

 ---

 18.3

 High-Poverty Schools in District

 ---

 3.5

 Low-Poverty Schools in District

 ---

 0.0


Teacher Credentials
Data reported are the number of teachers (full-time and part-time) as reported by CBEDS. Each teacher is counted as "1". If a teacher works at two schools, he/she is only counted at one school. Data are not available for teachers with a full credential and teaching outside his/her subject area.

 

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

 Total Teachers
 

 113

 120

 124

 Teachers with Full Credential
 

 83

 89

 101

 Teachers Teaching Outside Subject Area
 (full credential but teaching outside subject area)

 0

 0

 3

 Teachers in Alternative Routes to Certification
 (district and university internship)

 5

 9

 9

 Pre-Internship 

 12

 14

 12

 Teachers with Emergency Permits
 (not qualified for a credential or internship but meeting minimum requirements)

 14

 14

 8

 Teachers with Waivers
 (does not have credential and does not qualify for an Emergency Permit)

 2

 0

 0


Teacher Misassignments
Data reported are the number of placements of a certificated employee in a teaching or services position for which the employee does not hold a legally recognized certificate or credential, or the placement of a certificated employee in a teaching or services position that the employee is not otherwise authorized by statute to hold.

 

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

 Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners
 

 ---

 ---

 8

 Total Teacher Misassignments
 

 ---

 ---

 11


Teacher Education Level
Data reported are the percent of teachers by education level.

 

   School  

   District  

 Doctorate

 2.4

 0.7

 Master's Degree plus 30 or more semester hours

 24.2

 25.1

 Master's Degree

 14.5

 15.6

 Bachelor's Degree plus 30 or more semester hours

 30.6

 36.9

 Bachelor's Degree

 28.2

 21.4

 Less than Bachelor's Degree

 0.0

 0.3


Vacant Teacher Positions
Data reported are the number of positions to which a single designated certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning of the year for an entire year or, if the position is for a one-semester course, a position to which a single designated certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning of a semester for an entire semester.

 

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

 Vacant Teacher Positions
 

 ---

 ---

 0


Teacher Evaluations

Just as students receive feedback regarding their performance, teachers also receive regular evaluations. Probationary teachers are evaluated every year and tenured teachers are evaluated every other year. The major areas covered in evaluation are student progress, instructional methods and effectiveness, adherence to the district curriculum, and establishment and maintenance of a suitable learning environment. The purpose of the evaluation is to ensure and promote quality instruction in all classrooms. 


Substitute Teachers

When teachers are absent, it is important to place substitutes of the highest quality in the classroom. The continuity and quality of the program depend on the ability of the substitutes to maintain the expected level of instruction. The district has had little trouble hiring and retaining qualified personnel. On rare occasions, when the number of substitutes needed exceeds the number of available substitutes, credentialed support personnel will cover those classes.  


Counselors and Other Support Staff
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100 percent (i.e., full time). Two staff persons who each work 50 percent of full time also equals one FTE.

 Title

   FTE  

 Counselor

 4

 Librarian

 1

 Psychologist

 1

 Health Assistant

 1

 Technology Technician

 1

 Other

 .6


Academic Counselors
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100 percent (i.e., full time). Two staff persons who each work 50 percent of full time also equals one FTE. The ratio of students per academic counselor is defined as enrollment as reported by CBEDS divided by the full-time-equivalent academic counselors.

 Number of Academic
Counselors (FTE)

 Ratio of Students Per
Academic Counselor

 4

 791.00


VII. Curriculum and Instruction

School Instruction and Leadership

The school provides every student the opportunity to engage in a rigorous, integrated and balanced core curriculum that begins in the seventh grade and builds from grade to grade. The curriculum is closely aligned with the California State Standards and it incorporates both the beginning and higher-level thinking skills that require students to formulate and solve problems, to make independent judgments, and to express thoughts logically and clearly in written and oral form. The school assures that all students are engaged in a balanced curriculum by having teachers follow district curriculum guides, content and performance standards, and state frameworks. Sound pedagogical practices, extensive instructional resources and a highly-trained staff provide effective strategies for every student to succeed.

The principal and department chairs continuously collaborate to produce an atmosphere of constant improvement. Teachers plan together in departmental groupings that regularly review student work in relation to the standards. Comprehensive information regarding student achievement is made available to the school on a regular basis, and that data guides most decisions regarding professional development. Subgroup data is carefully studied to identify under performing groups so that instruction may be targeted appropriately. Teacher accountability is viewed as a positive part of the school culture. The principal makes classroom visits to observe lessons and consult with teachers to keep instruction “on track”, and teachers regularly redesign their lessons to assure that they are challenging, rigorous, and aligned with standards.

Students who need additional support in meeting the demands of the curriculum utilize a network of services that help them succeed. Students whose primary language is not English receive structured English Immersion in the classroom from teachers holding appropriate credentials. Library resources and home to school materials are also made available in the primary language. A variety of support options are provided for other identified special needs students. An array of literacy enhancement programs is available to students eligible for Title 1 services. There are pull out programs as well as programs that use extended day and extended year models.

The school has a guidance intern and psychologist support. These professionals work with the Student Study Team to assess Special Education and Section 504 students and collaborate with parents in the development of appropriate individualized plans emphasizing access to the least restrictive educational environment. The district also sponsors numerous extended day activities for GATE students and trains their teachers to differentiate instruction.


Professional Development

Professional development activities are essential to the maintenance of a quality educational program for all students. Over the past three years, the district has provided more than 200 hours per year of professional development activities for teachers and classified staff. These programs have emphasized a standards-based approach to the core subject areas of English Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies.

Over the past three years the district has also provided 14 shortened days per year for schools to use in school-based planning and professional development activities. The school-based professional development program has addressed technology-based instruction; early literacy, shared decision-making, the utilization of standardized tests in the instructional program, and instruction for underachieving subgroups.


Quality and Currency of Textbooks and Other Instructional Materials

The State of California adopts textbooks every seven years. The district follows the state cycle for textbook adoption, and all classes have current text materials in the academic subjects.

Funding for instructional materials and textbooks changed with the implementation of the Instructional Materials Funding Realignment Program (IMFRP) in January, 2003. The IMFRP consolidated funding for instructional materials into one program. The priority under IMFRP is for each pupil in grades K-12 to be provided with standards-aligned instructional materials in reading/language arts, mathematics, history-social science, and science.

The apportionment amount of $37.55 per pupil enrolled K-l2 is based on the October 2002, California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) report. The total district allocation for the 2003-04 school year was $579,058. In reality, textbooks and support materials cost more than this amount; so the district provides additional money for these materials. Supplements to printed text materials are also provided through the use of technologies that include multi-media computing and video.


Availability of Sufficient Standards-Aligned Textbooks and Other Instructional Materials
The availability of sufficient state-adopted (grades K-8) and standards-aligned (grades K-12) textbooks and other instructional materials for each pupil, including English learners, that are consistent with the content and cycles of the curriculum frameworks adopted by the State Board of Education in the core curriculum areas of reading/language arts, mathematics, science, history-social science, foreign language, and health (for grades K to 12, inclusive); and science laboratory equipment (for grades 9 to 12, inclusive), as appropriate.

Every school year districts are required to hold a public hearing on the sufficiency of textbooks for each pupil enrolled within core subject content academic areas. The district has reliably met this annual requirement.

On June 24, 2004 the Board of Education certified that each pupil in the district, in kindergarten through grade twelve, has been provided with state adopted and/or standards-aligned textbook and basic instructional materials. Further, the Board certified that the provided textbooks and materials were in good condition and adopted within state instructional materials adoption cycle. There are sufficient textbooks and instructional materials for each student to use in class and to take home to complete required homework assignments.

Textbooks approved and certified for kindergarten through grade eight were purchased from the standards-aligned state adopted list as required in CCR, Title 5, Section 9531. For students in grades nine through twelve, the instructional materials were adopted by the Board following a district review of the materials and their alignment with content standards as required by CCR, Title 5, Section 9531.

 

 Core Curriculum Areas

 Availability of Textbooks/Materials

 Reading/Language Arts

 Each pupil

 Mathematics

 Each pupil

 Science

 Each pupil

 History/Social Science

 Each pupil

 Foreign Language

 Each pupil

 Health

 Each pupil

 Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12)

 Sufficient by course and by grade level


Instructional Minutes
The California Education Code establishes the required number of instructional minutes per year for each grade. Data reported compare the number of instructional minutes offered at the school level to the state requirement for each grade.

 Grade
Level

 Instructional Minutes

 Offered

 State Requirement

 7

 65,350

 54,000

 8

 65,350

 54,000

 9

 65,350

 64,800

 10

 65,350

 64,800

 11

 65,350

 64,800

 12

 65,350

 64,800


Total Number of Minimum Days

Seven Minimum Days are scheduled annually. They are: Back to School Night, the end of the First Quarter, the day before Winter Break, the end of the Second Quarter, the end of the Third Quarter, Open House and the last day of school. 


VIII. Postsecondary Preparation (Secondary Schools)

Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate Courses Offered
The Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs give students an opportunity to take college-level courses and exams while still in high school. Data reported are the number of courses and classes offered, and the enrollment in various AP and IB classes. The data for Fine and Performing Arts include AP Art and AP Music, and the data for Social Science include IB Humanities.

 Subject

 Number of Courses

 Number of Classes

 Enrollment

 Fine and Performing Arts

 0

 0

 0

 Computer Science

 0

 0

 0

 English

 2

 2

 37

 Foreign Language

 1

 1

 18

 Mathematics

 1

 1

 17

 Science

 1

 1

 14

 Social Science

 4

 6

 154


Students Enrolled in Courses Required for University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) Admission
Data reported are the number and percent of students enrolled in courses required for UC and/or CSU admission. The percent of students is calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in courses required for UC and/or CSU admission (a duplicated count) by the total number of students enrolled in all courses (also a duplicated count).

 Number of Students
Enrolled in All Courses

 Number of Students
Enrolled In Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 Percent of Students
Enrolled In Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 8591

 5959

 69.4


Graduates Who Have Completed All Courses Required for University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) Admission
Data reported are the number and percent of graduates who have completed all courses required for UC and/or CSU admission. The percent of graduates is calculated by dividing the total number of graduates who have completed all courses required for UC and/or CSU admission by the total number of graduates.

 Number of Graduates

 Number of Graduates
Who Have Completed All Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 Percent of Graduates
Who Have Completed All Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 370

 118

 31.9


SAT I Reasoning Test
Students may voluntarily take the SAT test for college entrance. The test may or may not be available to students at a given school. Students may take the test more than once, but only the highest score is reported at the year of graduation. Detailed information regarding SAT results may be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sp/ai/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 

 School

 District

 State

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 2002

 2003

 2004

 Grade 12 Enrollment

 377

 410

 440

 825

 855

 888

 365,907

 385,181

 395,194

 Percent of Grade 12
 Enrollment Taking Test

 39.5

 40.2

 34.8

 34.9

 31.7

 26.1

 37.3

 36.7

 35.2

 Average Verbal Score

 479

 485

 472

 455

 465

 458

 490

 494

 496

 Average Math Score

 501

 507

 495

 481

 494

 478

 516

 518

 519


College Admission Test Preparation Course Program

The school offers online college admissions SAT/ACT test preparation programs through UC College Prep Initiative and Ivy West Test Preparation. In addition, an onsite, specialist led, Ivy West Test Preparation college admissions test preparation program is offered in the extended day and the extended year.


Degree to Which Students are Prepared to Enter Workforce

The mission of California’s high schools is to nurture the intellectual, physical, emotional, and moral capacities of each student to the fullest extent possible so that each can profit by continued schooling and ultimately lead a fulfilling life in our society as a productive worker, citizen, and private individual. In order for students to be prepared for the 21st century, they must not only be able to read and compute, but also to think creatively and critically, and to adapt to change.

Mayfair High/Middle School is preparing students for tomorrow’s workplace through the rich learning environment of a thinking, meaning-centered, curriculum. The school’s instructional programs engage students intellectually to master the traditional academic skills and the more complex skills of thinking and problem solving. A rigorous emphasis is placed on the curriculum content of technology-based computer instruction, oral communication skills, reading for meaning, and writing for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Mayfair High School employs a Career Technician who is responsible for preparing and implementing career preparation activities appropriate for each grade level. Students have access to college/career exploration software beginning in the seventh grade.

The school provides students practical work experiences beyond the classroom setting. Some of these opportunities included: College Night sponsored by Cerritos College, guest speakers from local businesses, ROTC and related military activities, and vocational education experiences.


Enrollment and Program Completion in Career/Technical Education (CTE) Programs
Data reported are from the Report of Career-Technical Education Enrollment and Program Completion for School Year 2002-2003 (CDE 101 E-1). Data have been aggregated to the district level.

 CTE Participants 

 Secondary CTE Students

 Grade 12 CTE Students

 Total
Course
Enrollment

 Number
of
Concentrators

 Number
of
Completers

 Completion
Rate

 Number
of
Completers

 Number
Earning
Diploma

 Graduation
Rate

 2921

 1131

 593

 52.4

 450

 353

 78.4


IX. Fiscal and Expenditure Data

County offices of education are not required to report average salaries and expenditures. The California Department of Education's School Fiscal Services Division does not calculate statewide average salary and expenditure information for county offices of education.

Average Salaries (Fiscal Year 2002-2003)
Data reported are the district average salary for teachers, principals, and superintendents, compared to the state average salaries for districts of the same type and size, as defined by Education Code Section 41409. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/salaries0203.asp.

 Category

 District
Amount

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 Beginning Teacher Salary

 $40,424

 $35,155

 Mid-Range Teacher Salary

 $59,468

 $57,318

 Highest Teacher Salary

 $72,107

 $72,153

 Average Principal Salary (Elementary)

 $95,295

 $91,625

 Average Principal Salary (Middle)

 

 $95,718

 Average Principal Salary (High)

 $110,786

 $102,706

 Superintendent Salary

 $171,632

 $150,248

 Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries

 43.3

 42.9

 Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries

 5.2

 5.3


Expenditures (Fiscal Year 2002-2003)
Data reported are total dollars expended in the district and the dollars expended per student at the district compared to the state average. Detailed information regarding expenditures may be found at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/.

 District

 District

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 State Average
All Districts

 Total Dollars

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 Dollars per Student
(ADA)

 $94,288,969

 $6,178

 $6,882

 $6,822


Types of Services Funded

The ADA dollars cited in the table above provide services budgeted from the general fund including regular classroom instruction and support, special education, counseling, psychology, child welfare and attendance and program assessment. Additional services funded as categorical programs include: Title 1 and Title VI assistance to targeted populations, Caring Connections community services, services for English Learners, School Improvement Programs (SIP), Safety and Violence Prevention, Drug and Tobacco Education (DATE), Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE); and Safe and Drug Free Schools.